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BB10K Race Report | Jayden Miller – Peak Performance Running

Jayden shares her BB10K running experience – she stepped up her training for this race and it really payed off! Jayden has been running with Peak Performance Running for 2+ Years. Step inside Jayden’s race and see what was going through her head at the start, during, and just after the race. Get to know more about Jayden!

Here at Peak Performance Running we believe in setting big goals, long-term goals, and helping athletes get the most out of a sport they love. Jayden has worked closely with her support team (Mom, Dad, and sisters) and her coaching team to help her reach her highest potential. Jayden had a self appointed goal to run a PR at the Bolder Boulder 10K. Alogn the way she gained confidence, strength, and most importantly- going through the process of achieving a long term goal. Read her story!

Jayden Miller Peak Performance Running

Jayden at Junior Olympic Colorado State Cross Country 2017

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I had been training for the Bolder Boulder for a while. In April I did a 10k in Arvada. However, I totally bonked during the race and had a slower time on that course than I did when I ran the Bolder Boulder a year ago. So, my coach, Andrew, created a training calendar for me that I would do every week. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday I would train with my team as usual. But on Thursday I would do an extra four miles at conversation pace. Then at the end of these miles I would put in four one-hundred-meter strides. Later, on Sunday I put in an extra-long run. Often, I would have a race on Sunday, so I would skip the long run or simply run the 5K course again as a cool down.

Before the Bolder Boulder 10K, I was really nervous, I felt as though I would throw up, and the feeling didn’t go away until the gun went off marking the start of the race. But that happens to me before every race. I woke up at 4:30 am to get some food in me at least an hour before warming up at 5:45 am. I managed to eat some scrambled eggs and turkey bacon. I say managed because it is often hard for me to eat before races because I am so nervous, but I am getting better at it.

Jayden Miller Running of the Green - Peak Performance Running

Jayden hamming it up at The Runnin’ of the Greek 7K

Getting ready for the race is really nerve racking. Most of my teammates were quiet because of the nerves that they had. There was also some time when we were waiting for more people to show up and I just stood there thinking about the race… like what if something went wrong during the race. This made me even more nervous. The main thing I was thinking about before the race was not going out too hard and not going off pace. We warmed up with our usual warm up. highkness, butt kicks, karaoke, shuffling, A skip, B skip, lunging. We mainly talked about the race and what we feared about it, but there were some giggles about the outfits that some of the people were wearing. It was nice to have my Peak Performance teammates there with me though, because they always help me handle my nerves and I can help handle theirs.The first mile in the race is always my fastest. I always start off super-fast and then go back to my pace later in the race. Every time I start a race, I try to keep myself from going too fast, but at the start is where I feel best and where everyone else just takes off, so I wind up going way too fast.

The race started in waves, most of my teammates started in wave A, the fastest wave, but I started in wave AB the third wave. As I stood there waiting for my wave to start, I mainly focused on staying loose and I went through the race mile by mile. I expected my first mile to be one of my fastest, but I remembered that to stay on pace I wanted to run a 7:32 minute mile for the first. But I also remembered that if I felt good I should go a little faster. When I started the GPS on my watch which often takes five minutes to complete, and then focused on staying loose.

When wave A started I silently cheered on my friends in wave A like Lilly, a girl a year older than me, Britney one of my awesome coaches, Andrew another awesome coach, and others. Then, before I knew it, my wave was next to go. The start line was right above my head and the announcer and gunman were just to the left of me. I looked out at the course and saw the AA wave still in sight. The announcer started to count down.When I looked down at my watch and saw that it was ready to go. The gun blasted, and I ran across the pads that lay on the ground that activated my chip and pressed the start button on my watch as soon as I stepped on the pad. I could hear my parents cheering for me, but I was too focused on where I was going to look for them

Jayden with the Peak Squad at the Colfax Marathon Relay

About two minutes later, I heard my watch beep. When I looked at it, it read Satellite Failure, and I knew that I would have to do the Bolder Boulder without a watch for pacing. While I was worried about not knowing my pace, I was having fun watching a man running right next to me stop at every beer station along the race and getting a can. I would pass him while he drank, and then he would sprint by me a couple of minutes later and get another beer from another station. (Eventually he didn’t catch back up after a beer stop.)

It was also nice that they had bands on the course, who played songs that I did not know, or songs that would make me so excited that I would have started singing and dancing in the middle of the course. I was tempted to go on the slip and slide, but then I remembered the time I wanted and so I didn’t do it. There was also bacon on the course, but I knew that if I ate that I would get a cramp in the race. I often thought about the next mile or kilometer I would reach and tell myself that I was only four kilometers away, halfway there, two more miles away, one kilometer away. Since I couldn’t use my watch I was also thinking about my pace, whenever I felt like I wasn’t going fast enough, I quickened my pace until the pace felt like a 7:30 minute mile pace.

Before the big hill at the end of the Bolder Boulder I was hurting a little but not terribly. As I approached the hill, I did what my dad always tells me to do, smile and think positively. I took the hill step by step, with deep breaths. The only thing I was thinking about during the last two miles was maintaining pace, I know I say that a lot, but not maintaining the pace is what scares me most because if I go off pace I would not get my goal, and I wanted that 46-minute 10k badly. The stadium was huge with many

Jayden Miller at Junior Olympic Region 10 Cross Country

people. The ground was covered with a white plastic covering, making it extremely slippery and hard to sprint on. I could see the giant screen, showing people finishing. People covered the seats that surrounded three fourths of the stadium, then as I rounded the curve I could see a large dome that marked the end of the race. Then I started to quicken my pace. I was mainly looking for my parents who I could hear, but not see. I could feel relief from the runners around me and myself and energy from the
crowd.

I did not know I beat my goal until five minutes after my finish. Since my watch was not working the entire race I messed around with my watch trying to find out what went wrong, and I looked to see if the timer had worked and it had! So that was when I knew I had met my goal of running a time in the 46s 10K – almost 2 minutes faster than my time the year before, and that made me feel so relieved, joyful, like I wanted to scream with excitement.

Most of the squad! A few not pictured finishing warm ups!

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